greek to me

 

I have been going through the readings for Chapter 7 in the JACT Greek text I use for a year or so.  I put the Greek on the left side of the page with lots of space, then translate the word and often identify it’s grammatical function. The right hand side is reserved for study notes (which I use often). This morning it occurred to me that would be a good way to study Homer (the original inspiration for this insane task in my 60s). Surely there were online resources for this.

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It turns out there are amazing online resources for studying Homer. Tuft University has extensive texts online. In the Odyssey resource, each Greek word is a link to the very things I am interested in knowing about it.

I have looked at this website before, but this morning I had an “aha” moment. I now have enough grammatical understanding and vocab that it is time for me to tackle the Odyssey.

It helps that Emily Wilson’s wonderful recent translation has exactly the same number of lines as Homer. Each of her lines are not a direct translation of the Homeric line, however, I am putting her line by line translation into my new Odyssey notebook on the right page.

This is exciting for me. Today I began working on this in earnest after several years preparation. I am planning to continue working in the JACT text simultaneously.

day 3 of exercising

 

I decided to exercise before work today. I was judging from yesterday, that this should not be a problem for me as far depleting energy needed for church and it wasn’t.

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I was inspired by pictures of Bill Clinton “jogging.” I didn’t know you could run like that. I pictured running as something that was so strenuous it would kill me.  I don’t exactly run vigorously. It’s much more like a trot, but it does seem to be more active than walking on the treadmill for 45 minutes, so the desired effect is possibly achieved.

I’ve mentioned these 15 plays that were in a New York Times Style magazine a while ago. Last night Eileen and I watched a couple. They are fun. The characters in “Presidential” are Jared and Ivanka. They are discussing which of them should run for President in 2024. Here’s a link to both the video and the script.

The other video we watched was of Terrence McNally’s “Muses of Fire.”

Terrence McNally, the author, wrote himself into the play.

 

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McNally wrote his dead lover, Edward Albee, in as well.

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Here’s a link to an NYT interview by McNally. that accompanied the play. I like these actors in the McNally piece as well as the writers they portray.

I started writing this  blog post before church. It’s now about 2:30 on Sunday afternoon and I’m building up energy to go back and practice.

The choir did a bang up job today. They sang Ellington’s “Come Sunday” beautifully and the soloist, Elizabeth Brubraker, did a wonderful job. I used the tune in the improvised piano prelude and that came off well.

My May recital is two weeks from today. My Bach is in pretty good shape but it needs daily maintenance. This week I plan to pull this recital together. All the players have consented to their part. Now I have to get some stuff in their hands. It’s all pretty easy music for the most part.

Speaking of the Bach, I love the fact that the manuscript which is our source for this piece is sitting online where anyone can view it (link to the pdf).  The handwriting is of Johannes Ringk who owned the manuscript. It is possible that he copied it from a manuscript in the possession of Kellner who was a pupil of Bach.

I dug it up to answer some questions I had about it.

Now before I go, a few fun video embeds (since I couldn’t figure out to embed the NYT’s videos mentioned above).

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Ever since hearing the Russian Rennaissance perform, I have been thinking about the way they did Prokofiev’s Piano Toccata, Opus. 11.

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I like visual illustrations of music like this one.

But these guys are closer to the way the Russian Renaissance did it.

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And just for fun, I have embedded this to begin at their interpretation of Ellington’s “Caravan