All Comments

  • From Mark Jenkins on a day off

    I’m curious… when you say Comey’s book reads like a first book, I think of the fact that seldom, if ever, does an author’s first book see the light of day. Consequently I read your comment as highly critical.

    Most authors don’t get published until they’ve written two or three failed books. Do you see his book as a failed book or simply as one that could be better written? I sort of thought that, for someone who could easily have hired a ghost writer, Comey did remarkably well to have written it on his own. Any failures are as much the product of his editor (always a coauthor) as of Comey.

    I see the difference between his book and Albright’s as being more the result of the quality of mind and the frame of reference behind the book. Comey is a lawyer and a legal mind as well as a white male of privilege. His book reflects that as do his interviews of this past week. Albright on the other hand has the mind of a diplomat and a woman and a refugee. She sees the nuance of interpersonal and international relationships in a way that is seldom seen in lawyers.

    Just curious….

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    • From jupiterj on a day off

      I was thinking more of Grisham’s first novel, A Time to Kill which is a clunkier and less skilled than his later books. Also, there’s Margaret Atwoods early novel, Surfacing, which I defended to my reading club as being worthwhile to read despite it not being up to her later abilities.

      I do not think that Comey failed with his book, only that the seams are showing. I too admire that he wrote himself and know that takes a lot of stamina and talent. In fact, having almost finished the book and watching the Colbert interview on YouTube last night, I am filled with respect for Comey. He is an insider and it’s interesting to read his book skeptically with that in mind. As he says in the Colbert interview he has many stories to tell and and only wanted to include those that contributed to his discussion of leadership. I think this discussion is critical right now. I also think that Comey is that rare animal in our time, a true leader. Maybe we should chat on the phone?

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  • From Rhonda Edgington on jupes continues to ramble

    aw man – your brother was at the Festival of Faith and writing!? I was too!
    I could have met him, which I would have enjoyed, and heard what he was there to check out, and what he enjoyed – always fun at that festival.
    Maybe we were sitting beside each other at a reading at some point!

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    • From jupiterj on jupes continues to ramble

      Rev Jen and Beth Trembley were also there. If I think of it, next time, I’ll try to connect you all.

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      • From Rhonda Edgington on jupes continues to ramble

        I saw them, (and sat with them and chatted with them) but that’s also because I know what they look like!:) And I expected to see them there.

        The mysterious Mark Jenkins could have been sitting beside me listening to a poet read, and I wouldn’t even have know it…

        Though had I know he was there, I could have looked for older men who look like you, walked up behind them and said, “Mark!” and looked if they flinched.

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  • From Elizabeth on on deck

    Typotypotypo

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  • From Elizabeth on on deck

    I bought you that book of essays by Mhosin Hamid. And just finished East West – it’s kijd of sci-fi!

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    • From jupiterj on on deck

      Yikes! You mean you bought it for me a while back? What’s the title?

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  • From Barb on sheepish, sorry, and hoping for the return of groove

    Perfect timing on “getting your groove back”. I like it!

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  • From Cindy Cosway on jupe's never ending story continued

    David Byrne has done some awesome things for the world of Color Guard. Cassidy is thoroughly devoted to all things Color Guard, which explains the reason I know this tidbit – which may or may not be of interest to you. https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/features/contemporary-color-how-david-byrne-found-unlikely-new-rock-stars-w469765

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  • From Jonny Keen on a death

    Sorry to read about the death of your mother. May the Lord comfort you and family in this season of sorrow. Jonny & Carol

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  • From Jonny Keen on a death

    Sorry to read about the death of your mother. Our prayers are with you/family in this time of sorrow. May the Lord be with you & family

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  • From Barb on a death

    I am so sorry for your loss. When my Dad died I also had a mixture of relief and sadness. My mother had died 10 years earlier and my Dad was incredibly lonely. When he died he was ready. May peace be with you, Eileen and your family.

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  • From Rhonda Edgington on getting shit done

    Eastern European, and Scandanavian, that is…

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  • From Rhonda Edgington on getting shit done

    We heard Vasen play in Bloomington – there is a huge world music festival there each spring, and a friend of mine who was into Eastern European music told me to check them out. It was 20 years ago, and for some reason they looked younger… But they are pretty amazing players!

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    • From jupiterj on getting shit done

      I think it’s very cool that you heard this group live. They popped up on my YouTube subscription feed which I happen to check.

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  • From Michelle Smith Kingsley on working on mom stuff

    I’m so sorry to read of your mom’s failing. I hope that you & your brother have many memories that comfort you & give you strength. Michelle in NH

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    • From jupiterj on working on mom stuff

      Thank you, Michelle. Yes Mom has had a long full life. She’s 91. As I watch people die in their old age, I tend to think of their entire life not just their present situation. This is a difficult time, but I think I am doing okay.

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  • From Cindy Cosway on processing mom's death, poetry, and jacob

    I’m sorry to hear that your mom is not doing well.
    Sad face.
    Hugs.

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  • From Elizabeth on harpsichord back in holland

    I’m so glad to hear your harpsichord is back. Sorry it’s been such an ordeal to have this guy patch it up. Blargh.

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    • From jupiterj on harpsichord back in holland

      I spent some time with it yesterday. It’s very different. Much lighter touch and some need of adjustment, but it’s looking very good for using it. I need to acclimatize to it before playing it in public, however.

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  • From Elizabeth on still a bit ill

    Ah, that’s a nice thank you note! I love you and hope you are doing better.

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  • From jupiterj on sick day

    So, you’ve read it. You only say that it was interesting. I have been drawn in a la Le Guin’s comments that it does draw one in. I think it’s an absorbing honest tale and probably an important one when you think about the science and morality involved. I can see where the author came in for criticism despite her meticulous work. I find that “you can’t talk about something if you’re not in the group” approach not very convincing. It sometimes reminds me of “only black people can play jazz or the blues.” Something I also find not convincing. I think I’ve read The Help. I seem to know it. I remember it as a bit weak. And missing a lot of the innate hypocrisy of the situation but I may be reading that back.

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  • From Elizabeth on sick day

    Ha. That’s funny she recommends The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and The Help together. There has been a *lot* of criticism of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks — I’ve read it. It is interesting. Written by a white woman, which has allowed certain criticism to stick… Also it’s a movie. Oprah stars: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/12/arts/television/oprah-winfrey-on-the-the-immortal-life-of-henrietta-lacks.html

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  • From Jordan on you're the only one today

    Hi Steve,

    I love your piece! It is very beautiful. I wish I could be there to hear it, but I am hoping that you will provide a recording of these excellent musicians playing it. The saxophonist, Adam Briggs, is a good friend of mine. I still read this blog, by the way!

    J

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    • From jupiterj on you're the only one today

      Jordan, Thank you for comments and encouragement! I’m glad that you are reading the blog as well. I’m not sure about the recording. Rhonda does record her recitals I believe. I will pass on anything that comes out of this.

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  • From Barb on you're the only one today

    Keep blogging Steve. I enjoy reading them…

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